divorce mediation

Mediation – Collaborative Law

Mediation – Family Law Mediator

Mediation is not psychotherapy, marital counseling or legal representation. A family mediator with a background in law does not represent clients during the mediation process, but rather serve as neutral facilitators of the decision-making process.

Collaborative Law

In Collaborative Law (also called Collaborative Practice), the parties work with attorneys and other trained professionals to reach an agreement without going to Court, except to obtain the final approval by a judge. Learn more about Collaborative Law and Collaborative Divorce.

Marital Mediation

Marital Mediation is not therapy or counseling. Marital mediation is not about your parents’ marriage or analyzing why you behave the way you do. Instead, as an objective third party, Lynda Robbins listens and helps you think outside the box as we explore alternatives you may not have thought about before to address problems and concerns in your marriage. By addressing the superficial concerns, it allows parties to focus on their relationship and strengthen rather than dissolve their marriage.
Unlike Divorce Mediation or Collaborative Divorce Practice, in which the objective is to make the divorce process as smooth and fair as possible, the goal of Marital Mediation is to seek ways to keep the couple together and resolve their differences.

Family Law Mediation & Divorce Mediation is a non-adversarial process for resolving Family disputes associated with:

  • Separation
  • Divorce
  • Post-divorce modifications
  • Non-traditional family issues
  • Prenuptial agreements
  • Post-marital agreements
  • Relationship agreements
  • Estate and other family issues

A family mediator is a neutral, trained individual who helps parties:

  • Create an agreement for their particular circumstances
  • Understand the laws applicable to divorce and separation
  • Negotiate fair and reasonable determination of parental responsibilities, financial obligations and division of property

The Mediation Process

Mediation is not psychotherapy, marital counseling or legal representation. A family mediator with a background in law does not represent clients during the mediation process, but rather serve as neutral facilitators of the decision-making process.

Through the mediation process the parties:

  • Determine their own solution
  • Become empowered to present their concerns
  • Learn about the legal and financial framework for their dispute
  • Minimize the expense of court proceedings
  • Reduce the emotional toll of conflict
  • Preserve on-going relationships
  • Emphasize the well-being of their children

Traditionally, the parties meet with the mediator directly. They are also encouraged to work with attorneys throughout the process. Attorneys provide the parties with legal advice specific to their circumstances and assist the parties in maneuvering through the part of their process that requires them to go to court to finalize their agreement.

Mediation Resources

Mediation Frequently Asked Questions

Lawyers and Mediation: Their Role as Consultants,” by Lynda J. Robbins, MCFM Family Mediation Quarterly, Vol.2, No. 2, Spring 2003

Bringing Peace into the Room: How the Personal Qualities of the Mediator Impact the Process of Conflict Resolution,” by Lynda J. Robbins, MCFM Family Mediation Quarterly, Vol.3, No. 2, Spring 2004, Book Review (also reprinted in The Collaborative Review, Volume 6, Issue 3, Winter 2004)

Massachusetts Council on Family Mediation – The Massachusetts Council on Family Mediation, Inc. (MCFM) is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing professional support and public information regarding the practice of mediation.